Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

Reply to this post | See parent post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: bluedevil Date: Apr 2, 2011 8:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Oh Bluedevil???? Where are you?????

On Butler And UConn
by DBR, March 27th, 2011 | Main |
You could argue that this year’s tournament is the most entertaining in years, if not ever. Saturday’s games did nothing to alter that.

What else is there to say about Butler at this point? Brad Stevens, at 33, has put himself firmly in the top echelon of coaches, and will get a multi-million dollar payoff as soon as he decides he wants it.

In the Indianapolis paper, columnist Bob Kravitz argues that there’s no way Butler can keep him, that he’s meant for bigger things, and he’s probably right, unless of course Stevens doesn’t want to go. Who knows? Likely only Mr. and Mrs. Stevens.

Folks around the program are fond of talking about “the Butler way,” and part of that includes not renegotiating Stevens’ contract after last season, but simply giving him a large raise, no questions asked.

Stevens has said he admires and appreciates that, and his boss is a predecessor as coach. There are things worth keeping, clearly.

Perhaps the best thing about Butler is that it’s still far enough from the so-called big time to avoid a lot of the crap that infects most of the college basketball world. Like Arizona shortly after the arrival of Lute Olson, there is a level of innocence still.

That’s certainly not the case for the second team to make the Final Four.

In many ways, UConn, the last Big East team alive, is the poster child for college corruption. When you see Jim Calhoun’s teams play, they typically play the game at a high level. Defense is superb, offense is balanced, and he definitely knows how to coach.

Yet when you look at his program, it frankly reeks. Whether it’s restraining orders, drug arrests, assistants being arrested for solicitation, players stealing laptops from fellow students, shoplifting charges or most recently the role of a former student manager-turned-agent played in recruitment of Nate Miles, there is a stench about Calhoun’s program. And when you look at the overall stench, it’s no better than what happened at UNLV or Kentucky or anywhere else.

The sad thing is that while Calhoun was not a supernova talent who burst on the scene like Stevens — rather he was a talented scrapper who came up the hard way and has the classic resentment of the silver spoon — he nonetheless took a downtrodden, more or less anonymous program and raised it to the top of the game. People forget that UConn at one point was sort of where DePaul is now, only without the deep historical tradition the Blue Demons have. They were no better than Seton Hall or Rutgers and actually probably worse.

You have to wonder if Stevens, when he looks at the other schools and coaches who are left, except for VCU and Shaka Smart who is about the same age and now on a similar trajectory, what he thinks: is Calhoun his future? Calipari?

Does he want to move to a big school and get caught up in that world? Does his ego require it? And what if that world comes to Butler, still a relative haven from the world that those sorts of coaches call home?

There’s a world of difference still between Stevens and Calhoun, between Butler and UConn, between Bulldogs and Huskies.

One hopes that as the world continues to open for Stevens, as the seductive powers of money and fame work their corrosive magic, that he can stay true to the Butler way whether he stays at Butler or not.

One hopes that when he looks down the sideline Saturday and sees Calhoun, that he sees what fame and fortune have done to the one-time scrapper.

No question that this year’s UConn team has sprung from Calhoun’s tenacity and that aspect of his character is magnificent. Yet just behind it is his arrogance and his willingness to either cut corners or allow his assistants to do it (and worse yet allow them to attempt to assume the blame, likely derailing or at least slowing their careers).

One hopes that Stevens, and now Smart as well, are, well, smarter than that. But you don’t know how success magnifies your flaws until you get there.

Whatever happens, however admirable Calhoun’s resilience may be, the fact is that he runs a corrupt and often disturbing program. The contrast between the two couldn’t be clearer. Butler may not win next weekend, but Stevens will if he learns the lessons Calhoun has refused to.


http://www.dukebasketballreport.com/articles/?p=39487

This post was modified by bluedevil on 2011-04-03 03:11:35

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 2, 2011 8:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Oh Bluedevil???? Where are you?????

We won! We won! I can't believe this.

I'll read/respond to your post BD, but I'm going to hoist a few. We won!

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: splue Date: Apr 2, 2011 8:22pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Oh Bluedevil???? Where are you?????

i chose my teams entirely by mascot

that cute bulldog sitting out there politely had me at drool

congrats

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: bluedevil Date: Apr 2, 2011 8:21pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Oh Bluedevil???? Where are you?????

I love Kemba, I really do. The kid is a winner and the run he's had in March matches up with anyone ever. That said, I'm all about Butler on Monday. I do not like Calhoun and I do not like how he runs his program. You can call that sour grapes, because as tito knows, I'll admit he's outcoached K before. I was there in Tampa. I know. That said, Calhoun is not good for the game. Congrats and enjoy. GO BULLDOGS! (but if i had to wager money....)

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: bluedevil Date: Apr 2, 2011 11:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Oh Bluedevil???? Where are you?????

April 1, 2011
As UConn Plays On, Once-Prized Recruit Can Only Watch
By PETE THAMEL and ZACH HILLESLAND
The former University of Connecticut basketball recruit Nate Miles is effectively homeless. He moves from friend’s couch to friend’s couch, still recovering from a violent assault that left him with a stab wound and a punctured lung and a monthlong stay in the hospital.

Miles, 23, has obligations to go with his troubles, two sons from different mothers, and no great confidence in where his next meal is coming from. A life playing basketball, the sport he once planned to make a grand career of, seems unlikely. He was fired from the Premiere Basketball League’s Dayton, Ohio, team, and he now says he cannot afford to play at a local recreation center because he lacks the $10 fee.

While Connecticut plays in the Final Four on Saturday in Houston, led by Miles’s former campus roommate, Kemba Walker, he is in his hometown, Toledo, a not unfamiliar casualty of what many regard as the cynical and broken system of big-time college recruiting.

“I don’t feel like it’s fair, but it’s life; life isn’t fair,” Miles said.

In two interviews in Toledo, Miles offered a window into major college sports. He said he went to six high schools in five years before heading to Connecticut. At one point in high school, he said, he got $250 every three days from an N.B.A. agent that he said a former UConn assistant coach introduced him to. He said he received improper help on at least two of the standardized tests he took to qualify academically to play in college, but for all that he never played a game for Connecticut, or any other Division I university.

Connecticut and its longtime coach, Jim Calhoun, have already been punished for a variety of sins in their recruitment of Miles. The N.C.A.A. has limited the number of scholarships Connecticut can award, has placed its basketball program on probation and suspended Calhoun for three games next season.

But the N.C.A.A., which issued its punishments in February and declared its investigation over, never interviewed Miles, who refused to take part in the investigation. He now says he is ready to tell the full story of his journey from cherished prospect to Connecticut recruit to leading man in a significant university scandal to homeless young father.

“I’d probably be open to talk to them, and, you know, get some things straight,” Miles said.

The N.C.A.A. is taking Miles seriously; a representative of the organization went to his grandmother’s house on Friday.

Earlier, Stacey Osburn, a spokeswoman for the N.C.A.A., said of the initial investigation into Miles’s recruitment: “In addition to attempting to directly contact Nate Miles, the N.C.A.A. enforcement staff reached out to four people associated with him through phone, in-person outreach, e-mail and other modes, including social media. During these efforts, it was made clear Nate was not going to talk to us. If new information comes to light, the next step is to assess its credibility and determine if further steps are needed.”

Miles, for many, is less than a fully credible character. He was kicked out of UConn before playing a game, and well before the scandal involving his recruitment became public. He said, after interviews with The New York Times, that he would demand to be paid for any other media interviews. And Miles’s admissions about taking cash from an agent conflict with a sworn statement he gave the N.C.A.A.

UConn officials said they have cooperated with the N.C.A.A. and were abiding by its judgments and punishments. They would not respond to specific questions about Miles’s current account.

Miles’s version of his recruitment, and his involvement with the N.B.A. agent Josh Nochimson, a former UConn team manager, is different than the one Calhoun gave in his 63-page response to the N.C.A.A.

When read a series of Calhoun’s statements to the N.C.A.A., including whether Calhoun and the Connecticut assistant Tom Moore warned Miles not to take gifts from Nochimson, Miles responded “lie” after each of them. That included whether Calhoun called Miles in March 2007 to caution Miles about Nochimson. “Lie,” Miles said.

Miles said Calhoun raised the subject of Nochimson with him only once, a few weeks after arriving at Connecticut and after Miles had received thousands of dollars worth of extra benefits. “He told me, like, he didn’t want me dealing with him anymore,” Miles said.

When asked if Calhoun was aware that Nochimson provided cash, clothes and food, and had paid for toe surgery for Miles, Miles said, “He knew.”

Connecticut officials rebutted that account in a statement Friday: “Coach Calhoun denies any claim that he knew that Nate Miles was receiving impermissible benefits. Moreover, Mr. Miles submitted a signed statement to the N.C.A.A. last year that contradicts his current story. Coach Calhoun cooperated fully with the N.C.A.A.’s investigation and considers this matter closed.”

The fallout over Miles’s recruitment is striking for many reasons, not the least of which is he never made it to a practice. He was thrown out of the university in fall 2008 after violating a restraining order.

Miles went on to junior college, but his collegiate career essentially ended in March 2009 when a Yahoo Sports investigation detailed his taking of gifts from Nochimson and the hundreds of impermissible phone calls and text messages from Connecticut staff members during his recruitment as a high school player. A Connecticut assistant coach, Pat Sellers, and director of basketball operations, Beau Archibald, resigned in the wake of the scandal.

Miles said he never would have met Nochimson if Moore, the former Connecticut assistant coach, had not introduced them. Miles said that Moore approached him after a prep school game in Illinois and physically put Miles on the phone with Nochimson. Calhoun’s statement to the N.C.A.A., which was in part based on interviews with Moore, stated, “Moore did not make the introduction.”

Miles said Moore introduced him to Nochimson because Miles had little support from his parents or access to money.

“He knew my home life, and as far as financially having somebody there, you know, to help me, so he put me on with Josh,” Miles said. “He called Josh right there and put me on the phone with him and everything, had me talking to him.”

Miles said that after he committed to play at Connecticut, which took place eight days after Moore introduced him to Nochimson, he began receiving gifts from Nochimson, shoes and clothes, and $250 every three days. “Once I committed and was really part of the family, he started to come, and help me out,” Miles said of Nochimson.

Moore, now the coach at Quinnipiac University, declined to comment in a telephone interview Thursday night. “I should probably just say no comment to anything,” he said.

Miles said he was not bitter toward Connecticut and acknowledged his mistakes, and his own participation in banned behavior. He said he appreciated Calhoun and Connecticut for the extraordinary efforts they made in recruiting him.

Calhoun told reporters after Miles had agreed to play for him that he had “as much basketball ability” as anyone he had ever recruited, a high compliment for a program that produced N.B.A. stars like Ray Allen, Rudy Gay and Emeka Okafor. In the N.C.A.A.’s report, UConn’s athletic director, Jeff Hathaway, said it was the “most intense” he’d seen Calhoun recruit a player.

“UConn was the only school willing to do what it took to get me cleared and eligible to play college basketball,” Miles said. “A lot of other schools were recruiting me, and wanting me just as bad as they were, but they weren’t willing to do the extra, to take the extra steps to get me cleared and eligible as Coach Calhoun and UConn.”

Miles’s jagged journey began in Toledo, with an alcoholic mother and a father who Miles said played basketball, hustled and didn’t do much else.

“I didn’t have a mom, dad,” he said. “I didn’t have nobody I could really lean on for advice, help, anything. I had nobody.”

Miles described living “house to house” during his first few years of high school. He then bounced among high schools, being thrown out of three of them, including well-known prep schools that specialize in handling promising athletes — Oak Hill Academy in Virginia and the Patterson School in North Carolina.

A person with direct knowledge of Miles’s time at the Patterson School said that Nochimson arranged for someone to fly to North Carolina to take the college entrance exam for Miles. The score from that test was not validated. Miles said he took the SAT twice with help, but declined to get into specifics, other than saying that he didn’t do all of his own work. The Patterson School has since closed.

“I had people helping, I mean I had somebody read over the questions, and basically in so many ways helped me swindle my answers down,” Miles said.

Miles said he ultimately came to thrive briefly at Cornerstone Christian High School in Texas, where he said the classes were online. But he said that he left because Calhoun feared that the coaching staff there or his host family would steer him to either Baylor University or U.C.L.A. He later spent a month at Notre Dame Prep in Massachusetts, but said he did not attend class.

Miles said he gets pangs of regret when he hears Charles Barkley or Dick Vitale talk about Walker, his former roommate, who was a much less heralded recruit than Miles.

“My stomach shakes every time because that could be me,” he said. “I was right there.”

Instead, he is out of basketball, without an agent and trying to find a career. He said he would tell any young basketball player to avoid taking extra benefits and to sacrifice in the short term.

“I’m definitely going to tell my kids to do it the right way,” he said of his two sons. “You know, because you don’t want to ever go through what Daddy went through. This is just something to learn from, grow from for real. And this is something that should never happen again.”

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: bluedevil Date: Apr 4, 2011 7:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Oh Bluedevil???? Where are you?????


Butler Hoops Team Under Investigation - AP

INDIANAPOLIS-- Butler's run in the NCAA Men's Basketball National Championship Game may be tarnished after reports surfaced today that all 13 players on the roster are being given good educations in an effort to help them find good jobs after they leave the school.

"It's important to remember that right now these are only allegations -- allegations that we are looking into," said NCAA president James Isch. "But, obviously, if true, this would be very disappointing. The NCAA has certain expectations and standards. It's not fair for players at one school to be given good educations while athletes at other member schools receive basic, remedial instruction that is worth essentially nothing."

According to documents seized from the school's registrar's office, Butler players have received an education worth $38,616 per year totaling more than $150,000 over a four-year career.

Compare that to players at a school like Kentucky, where tuition is set at $4,051 -- but with an actual value far below that.

“We don't want to say too much until these reports are confirmed," said Kentucky head basketball coach John Calipari. "But we're talking about almost $140,000 difference in education per player -- and that's even if my players stayed four years or graduated, which many of them do not. Then these Butler players are reportedly stepping into good jobs after graduation while my kids, if they don't make the NBA, have absolutely no job prospects or life skills. It's far from a balanced playing field. They are buying the best players by giving them a high-priced education."